Jumaat, 27 September 2013

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Najib proposes solving world problems via moderation

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 11:52 AM PDT

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(Bernama) - "You don't marginalise anyone…do not allow the voices of extremism, racism and bigotry drown your voice"

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak believes many of the world's current problems can be solved if society subscribed to the whole concept of moderation.

 

He said if the society and governments used moderation in their actions and policies, then the country would have a much more just, fair and inclusive society.

 

He said moderation was based on certain principles and sound values, like justice, sense of fairness, and choosing dialogue over confrontation, and negotiation over conflict.

 

"And, if you choose moderation and reject Nazism or militancy and extremist-thinking, there is every chance that we can work in a peaceful world," he said in his lecture, 'The New Meetings, Moderation: The New Modernity'.

 

The lecture was co-sponsored by the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)'s Religion and Foreign Policy Initiative, at the Peter G. Peterson Hall, The Harold Pratt House in New York.

 

The session was hosted by CNN's Fareed Zakaria, who is Editor-at-Large, TIME Magazine and member, board of directors, CFR.

 

The CFR members in Washington, DC were participating in the meeting via videoconference, and the meeting was being streamed live on CFR's website (www.cfr.org).

 

Najib said what people in Malaysia and other parts of the world wanted to see was peace, prosperity and harmony, which could be achieved if society subscribed to the whole concept of moderation.

 

"You don't marginalise anyone…do not allow the voices of extremism, racism and bigotry drown your voice," he added.

 

Najib said he was promoting the Global Movement of the Moderations through his talks worldwide because he believed that the problem in the world today was not between the Christians, Muslims and Jews, but it was really between the extremists and moderates.

 

Najib said he was looking for an alliance which subscribed to the same belief and principles, including from the United States, to promote and strengthen the cause.

 

Asked on his perception of Muslim suicide bombers during the Q&A session, Najib said he had spoken about it in his last talk at Oxford University in the UK that Islam was against suicide bombings.

 

"Islam tells Muslims not to kill innocent people, even during war. That act does not have the consent of Islam, and they are done by people who 'hijacked' Islam with their narrow and selfish political objectives," he said.

 

As such, he urged the media, especially in the West, not to describe them as 'Islam terrorist' or 'jihadist' because they were merely extremist, regardless of their religious beliefs.

 

"There is a danger in fuelling the Islam-phobia in the West. It would be useful if the media in the West is more discerning…they are just terrorists belonging to a certain group," he said.

 

Asked to comment on the 9/11 terrorist bombings of the World Trade Center in New York in 2001, Najib said it was a combination of several factors. He said Islam was never associated with violence, and based on historical facts, the people in Southeast Asia embraced Islam from Hinduism in a very peaceful manner.

 

"After 9/11, there were incidents of suicide bombings in Indonesia, and the governments of Malaysia, Indonesia and to some extent, Singapore, had taken effective steps to fight against terrorism.

 

"But, do not call them terrorist, because the most important thing is the underlying reasons why they carried out such terrorist acts…that's how, we approach the whole challenge," he said.

 

Najib said it had to be explained that Islam's stand was for progress and its priority was in education and the economic gain of the people, and even the Prophet taught Muslims not just to pray in the mosque all the time, but to work to earn a living.

 

"But, many people misunderstood and misinterpreted Islam," he added.

 

Najib, who is on a visit to New York to speak at the High-Level Meeting on Nuclear Disarmament at the 68th United Nations General Assembly on Thursday, had a busy work schedule on Thursday.

 

He had several bilateral meetings with leaders of several countries, attended business luncheons with the US-Asean Business Council and the US Chamber of Commerce, visited the New York Academy of Sciences, and attended a private high-level dinner hosted by Asia Society.

 

Najib is scheduled to deliver Malaysia's statement during the General Debate on Sept 28.


 

20 Points: The heart of the matter

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 11:42 AM PDT

Veteran leaders in Sabah should explain why, among others, the position and rights of the indigenous people is not similar to the special rights of Malays in Peninsula Malaya.

Joseph Bingkasan, FMT

KOTA KINABALU: Who should take credit (or blame) for initiating the 20 Points that led to Sabah joining the Malaya, Sarawak and Singapore to form a new federation Malaysia 50 years ago?

That's a point of contention for several pivotal Sabah politicians who were around at the time and are still arguing the point.

The debate comes a little over a week after the nation marked its golden jubilee, albeit on a low key, and with many in the two Borneo states lamenting that they had got a raw deal in comparison to Brunei and Singapore which are decades ahead in terms of development.

Now a Sabah-based non-governmental organisation has added its voice to the war of words between three pre-independent leaders on the topic.

Sabah Reform Movement (Angkatan Perubahan Sabah) or (APS) information chief Lesaya Lopog Sarudim said the media war between former chief minister Peter Lo Sui Yin and ex-United National Kadazan Organisation (Unko) deputy secretary general Majid Khan was all based on half-truths.

Lo had told a forum that the 20-Points was a Chinese-initiated document while Khan, supported by ex-federal minister Ghani Gilong refutes that claim arguing that Sabah's main political parties contributed 13 of the points.

"The argument on whether the 20-point was initiated by the Chinese or otherwise is not making any past mistake right," Sarudim told FMT.

APS is a pro-Pakatan Rakyat political platform headed by former Barisan Nasional MP for Tuaran Wilfred Mojilip Bumburing who contested on PKR ticket and won the Tamparuli state seat in the May 5, general elections.

Sarudim added that what Lo, Khan and Ghani were doing was adding to the confusion over the political history of Sabah leading up to the formation of Malaysia and the subsequent years when it lost much of its powers.

READ MORE HERE

 

Malaysian Politician Makes Crap Up, Says GTAV Is Banned in the U.S.

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 11:26 AM PDT

ZMhiZ6iwjr4 

(Kotaku) - In Malaysia, a member of Parliament named Reezal Merican Bin Naina Merican is asking his government to ban Grand Theft Auto V due to violence. His rationale is that the United States and the United Kingdom have already banned the game. They have? Oh really?

Um, no. They have not. Courtesy of tipster Mohamad, below you can see the Malaysian TV news clip in which he apparently mentions the GTA V ban. He starts his rambly speech with Devil May Cry 3, a game that was released a million years ago, calling it anti-Islam. Yeah.  

Watch video at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMhiZ6iwjr4 

On YouTube, the politician is being criticized for being totally wrong. And a dummy. 

Read more at: http://kotaku.com/malaysian-politician-makes-crap-up-says-gtav-is-banned-1409349580 

Malaysia kuat jika Melayu, Cina bersatu

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 10:56 AM PDT

http://uf.cari.com.my/forumx/mforum/forum/201309/26/211241o99uhdaa1ge9oewq.jpg

Datuk Nazri Abdul Aziz's son, Nedim's RM7.2m house 

(Berita Harian) - Najib menjelaskan, jika 67 peratus daripada penduduk asal ketinggalan di belakang, ia akan menyebabkan ketidakstabilan.

"Kita tidak boleh membiarkan keadaan ini kerana di segi politik ia adakah tidak baik. Apa yang dikehendaki ialah mewujudkan sebuah negara Malaysia yang adil, saksama dan inklusif. Itu yang hendak dicapai untuk membolehkan kekayaan disebarkan secara adil.

Kekayaan negara mampu disebarkan secara adil

Datuk Seri Najib Razak yakin Malaysia akan menjadi sebuah negara yang kuat jika orang Melayu dan Cina memupuk hubungan yang akrab.

"Jika 67 peratus orang Melayu dan 27 peratus orang Cina bekerjasama, kita akan menjadi sebuah negara yang bersatu dan kukuh," katanya dalam wawancara Program Hubungan Luar, dihoskan oleh pengacara CNN, Fareed Zakaria yang dipancarkan serentak di sini dan Washington, semalam. 

Perdana Menteri berkata, walaupun kaum Cina dipujuk supaya menyokong pembangkang atas alasan tertentu, tetapi di luar tempoh pilihan raya, mereka perlu bersatu atas matlamat untuk membina negara. 

Najib berkata, kaum Cina tidak seharusnya terlalu memikirkan soal kaum mereka saja tetapi perlu menganggap bahawa mereka adalah rakyat Malaysia.
Justeru, beliau yakin, jika kedua-dua kaum itu bekerjasama, ia mampu mewujudkan sebuah negara Malaysia yang tulen.

Dalam perbincangan bertajuk Kesederhanaan: Pemodenan Baharu yang dihadiri oleh kira-kira 200 orang itu, Najib menjawab berhubung tindakan kerajaan memberi keistimewaan kepada Bumiputera yang menimbulkan rasa tidak puas hati kaum lain.


Elak ketidakstabilan 
Najib menjelaskan, jika 67 peratus daripada penduduk asal ketinggalan di belakang, ia akan menyebabkan ketidakstabilan.

"Kita tidak boleh membiarkan keadaan ini kerana di segi politik ia adakah tidak baik. Apa yang dikehendaki ialah mewujudkan sebuah negara Malaysia yang adil, saksama dan inklusif. Itu yang hendak dicapai untuk membolehkan kekayaan disebarkan secara adil.

"Kita mahukan masyarakat yang inklusif dan mendapat pembahagian kekayaan yang saksama," katanya.

Bagaimanapun, Najib berkata, hari ini kaum Cina memiliki kekayaan yang lebih besar daripada Bumiputera dan berikutan itu mereka masih perlu dibantu mengikut merit.

Beliau juga berkata berkata tanpa tindakan afirmatif, ia akan menyebabkan perpecahan rakyat bertambah buruk pada masa akan datang. 

Call to review ties with Pakatan Rakyat “ridiculous”, says PAS deputy president

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 10:27 AM PDT

(TMI) - PAS deputy president Mohamad Sabu, also known as Mat Sabu (pic), has dismissed calls for a review of ties between the Islamist party and its two partners in the Pakatan Rakyat coalition, describing such talk as "ridiculous".

"It is not a good thing to divorce ourselves from the parties in Pakatan Rakyat. We have worked hard to build our relationship and now we want to tear it down?" the fiery leader said in an interview with The Malaysian Insider.

Besides PAS, the other two parties in Pakatan Rakyat are the multi-ethnic PKR and secular Chinese-dominated DAP.

Recently, PAS Dewan Ulama chief Datuk Harun Taib called for a review of PAS's relationship with Pakatan Rakyat.

The Islamic party's dismal performance in the 13th general election has led to some members urging the party to review its position within Pakatan Rakyat, especially with PKR.

Harun had blamed the party's over-tolerant stance to the demands from non-Muslims for eroding its support among Muslims.

Mohamad pointed out PAS has worked hard for a long time to win the support of non-Muslims as it needs their votes to win in the general election.

In explaining the party's modus operandi pre-2008, he said the party had a headache at every election over allocation of seats.

"We rejected seats with more than 20% non-Malay voters because we knew we would not be able to win," he said.

However, in the run-up to the 2008 general election, in which the ruling Barisan Nasional coalition eventually lost its two-thirds majority, Mohamad said the mood had changed. The Chinese and Indian voters were no longer afraid to support PAS due to its collaboration with PKR and DAP.

"To me, this is a blessing. We were exhausted before this trying to get their support, and suddenly we have them," he said.

He added that despite the best efforts of MCA and Umno to get the Chinese and Indian voters to stay away from PAS, the attempts failed.

READ MORE HERE

 

‘So much for Najib’s reforms’, The Economist says of Bumi agenda

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 09:30 AM PDT

Clara Chooi, MM

Datuk Seri Najib Razak sacrificed his political principles to launch the Bumiputera agenda and though the manoeuvre saved his job as Umno president, a leadership putsch may still be lying in wait for the prime minister, The Economist has said.

The international current affairs magazine pointed out that despite surviving the presidency polls without any contest, many among Umno's conservatives have placed bids on the party's second and lower echelons.

One candidate in particular stands out as a more significant threat, The Economist said, pointing to Datuk Mukhriz Mahathir, the youngest son of Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, who many say still holds sway among the party's right-wingers.

Dr Mahathir still remains a "hero" to many Malays, the magazine wrote, and influence is likely to rub off on his son, who in his own right had earned himself the post of Kedah Mentri Besar after the last general election.

"Should Mr Mukhriz win, the anti-Najib forces could coalesce around him as a proxy for his father," The Economist wrote.

"A weakened prime minister," it added, "could then be ousted in an internal putsch, a fate that befell Mr Najib's predecessor, Abdullah Ahmad Badawi, who also failed to deliver at the polls."

The magazine was weighing in on Najib's latest move to unveil the new Bumiputera empowerment agenda, an initiative worth over RM31 billion in economic aid, loans and programmes for the dominant community, of which the Malays form a huge chunk.

As the announcement had come just a week before nominations for the Umno polls, observers were quick to analyse the manoeuvre as a strategy by the leader to secure his seat as Umno president, an ultimately, his throne as prime minister.

The announcement had also come after a barrage of criticism and demands from pro-Umno blogs and organisations over the preceding weeks, urging the 60-year-old son of second prime minister Tun Abdul Razak Hussein to reward the Malays and Bumiputeras for their support in the recent national polls.

In the May 5 polls, Najib had led Barisan Nasional (BN) to a disappointing victory when the ruling pact failed, again, to win the coveted parliamentary super-majority and lost further ground to the nascent three-party Pakatan Rakyat opposition pact, when it took 133 seats to the opposition pact's 89.

But Najib and BN's saving grace had been Umno's performance and support from the Malay community, who helped the ruling party increase its federal representation by a sizeable nine parliamentary seats.

"However cynical, these moves seem to have saved Mr Najib's skin, at least for the moment," The Economist agreed of the Bumiputera agenda plan.

"He will not face a leadership challenge in the Umno elections. The prime minister has been helped by the fact that, in the end, Umno hardliners could find no sufficiently weighty figure to take him on."

When nominations closed for the Umno polls last Saturday, there was no challenger named for the Umno presidency and for the party's number two spot, allowing Najib's deputy — Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin — to stay as deputy for another term.

But The Economist said this would not matter to Umno hardliners.

"They have forced Mr Najib to shift direction," the magazine said.

"There is no denying the damage to Mr Najib's credibility," it added.

"To many Malaysians, even ethnic Malays, Mr Najib has sacrificed political principles to save his job. His campaigning slogan of '1 Malaysia', emphasising racial harmony, now rings hollow."

In keeping with the new Bumiputera plan, the "stuttering" Malaysian economy would now have to raise enough money for the programme.

The Chinese and Indian communities here would likely continue leaving the country, "disgusted" by the "overt racism of it all".

"And the country's stated goal of becoming a prosperous economy by 2020 will recede further," The Economist wrote.

"So much for Mr Najib's great reforms."

 

Alternative messages to the Malay heartland: Will they be heard?

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 09:22 AM PDT

According to Tengku Razaleigh, the nation needs a new economic model in the form of a "stakeholder economy… in which education, health, employment and business opportunities are available to all. In such an economy, advancement is through merit in conjunction with a criterion of need for the upliftment of the poor and the marginalized groups affected by the forces of liberalization and globalization."

Dr Lim Teck Ghee

In the last few weeks, with the chorus of chest-beating messages on the need for greater entrenchment of Malay rights and privileges growing stronger ahead of the coming Umno general assembly, there have emerged two Malay leaders who are willing to go against the chauvinistic tide to provide a different analysis of what is wrong with Umno and its political ideology and how to correct the Malay dilemma of poverty or stagnation for its masses amidst unprecedented wealth, power and privilege for its elite.

Datuk Zaid Ibrahim and Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah are no ordinary dissidents. They also cannot in any way be seen as traitors or disloyal to the Malay cause. They have been long-time staunch members of Umno with proven track records of dedicated public service and reputations of higher standards in integrity and honesty than most of their colleagues among our elite.

Their messages to the Malay heartland are sombre and brutal. They will certainly be seen as unwelcome and cruel. But in seeking to drive home the many uncomfortable truths that the contestants jostling for high positions pretend to not see or know about, they are doing the party and its followers much greater service than may be apparent.

Their views and the alternatives offered are important not only for Umno members and other Malays to appraise and debate; they are also important for all Malaysians to reflect upon as we search for the right road to ensure a fair and just future for all. 

Zaid points out that after many years of being "special", the Malays who are successful are never accepted for their ability; they must have received "special treatment" from Umno.

This is particularly true if they do not support Umno's policies. The dispensation of special treatment enables Umno to pick and choose the winners and after 40 years we can see clearly how some Malays are more equal than others.
The greed emanating from this group of the "New Rich" is shocking. The lower income groups remain untouched by new injection of financial and economic assistance; it is always the Malay Contractors; members of the Malay Chambers, and of course the elite who get the bulk of the special treatment. When will the Malays realized the special treatment formula is nothing special except for some?"

It is the same in education where the concept of a level playing field is an anathema to Umno's elite, and discriminatory policies have led to woeful standards, the exclusion of non-Malays and a damaging culture of in-breeding and mediocrity.

Again from Zaid:

"The Chancellor of Universiti Teknologi MARA proudly announced that the university is no place for non-Malays. He assumes that non-Malays want to go there in the first place. He also ignores the possible benefits that can come from having a more diverse student body — he is probably oblivious to the fact that we can learn valuable traits, attitudes and values from those who are different from us. It sadly does not occur to him that the presence of non-Malays might actually be useful for the Malays, the people he wants to champion."

The effect of the New Economic Policy (NEP) and its successor policies on the Malays has also been succinctly summarised.

According to Zaid:

"It's ironic that these leaders shouted Hidup Melayu to celebrate this pernicious policy, because it is actually a death knell for the Malays. The original policy of 40 years ago has become something else: it's now a repository of all that is crude, unsophisticated and unthinking. What can be simpler than the idea of grabbing as much as you can whilst you have power? The deleterious and negative effects of this can be seen in the behaviour and values of these Umno Malays."

Alternatives to the NEP

What then are the alternatives policies and strategies for Malay development and empowerment that can break away from the death trap of another 40 years of spoon-feeding, dependency and the malaise of blaming "the greedy Chinese" that has become the dominant Malay/Umno mindset?

What are the policies and strategies that can go beyond just addressing the Malay dilemma and the needs of Malays but also the plight of the other citizens who do not belong to the thin crust of Umno cronies and non-Malay elite, and who struggle to make ends meet in the same way that the Malay masses do?

According to Tengku Razaleigh, the nation needs a new economic model in the form of a "stakeholder economy… in which education, health, employment and business opportunities are available to all. In such an economy, advancement is through merit in conjunction with a criterion of need for the upliftment of the poor and the marginalized groups affected by the forces of liberalization and globalization."

To achieve this he argues that "we have to take it outside the NEP.  We need to address the social contract frontally, reaffirm the Federal Constitution, and set the NEP into remission. We need to turn the Malay Agenda argument on its head, and treat it as part of the National Agenda.

Razaleigh's "Amanah Malaysia" plan is still clouded in generalities but my understanding of its broad thrust is that after 40 years of the New Economic Policy and other similar Malayoriented affirmative action programmes which have mainly benefited Umno and its cronies and sapped the country's resources dry, it is time for the abandonment of a race-based strategy in addressing the racial and class inequalities found in the country.

Will Zaid's and Tengku Razaleigh's views get a hearing at the Umno meetings? Zaid is pessimistic and believes that the coming assembly will be the same as in the past with the limelight taken up by feedback to the latest Bumiputra empowerment policy and with much time devoted to Chinese-bashing and tongue-lashing against "ungrateful Malays".

New wave of Malaysians

Even if their views are not heard, an increasing number of Malays have begun to speak up against Umno's dead-end racial strategy. In a letter posted on the Astro Awani portal titled "Let all races compete on an even playing field", Zan Azlee rubbished Dr Alias Mohamed, the president of the National Association of Malay Journalists and Writers of Malaysia who wrote on an elaborate plan which only the simple minded or gullible can believe in that the Chinese have in trying to take over control and power of Malaysia.

In his response, Zan wrote:

I, and many other Malaysians of the new wave, don't believe in the segregation of race in the country anymore. We believe in one Malaysian race. Citizens of the country are citizens. It doesn't matter how many generations were born here or even if they were granted citizenship after they were born.Chinese, Malay, Indian, whatever. If we're Malaysian, then we're Malaysian. Band together to be stronger together. Not fight with each other. You know what they say. Bersatu kita teguh, bercerai kita roboh (Together we stand, divided we fall)."

Zaid, Tengku Razaleigh and Zan are minority voices and perspectives for now but for how long can the Umno spinmeisters and hardliners fool the Malay masses?

 

Read the letter again, Guan Eng

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 09:17 AM PDT

(Bernama) - Registrar of Societies (ROS) director-general Abdul Rahman Othman has once again told DAP secretary-general Lim Guan Eng to read and understand its statement on the party's central executive committee (CEC) re-election.

He said the ROS had never said that DAP could not hold a Special Congress but had instead just reminded the party to comply with its own constitution during the election.

"They must comply with the sending of notice for election to members within ten weeks as stated in the party constitution," he said in a statement here yesterday.

He noted that the court action against DAP over its disorganised CEC election was taken by its own members and not linked to ROS in any way.

"Its not fair to link ROS to this matter as the legal action was taken by their own people," he said.

Abdul Rahman further pointed out that although Section 18C of the Societies Act 1966 stated that a party's affairs were final, conclusive and not actionable in court, it did not mean that ROS was not authorised to uphold the truth, especially when party members were affected. 

 

PCA: Symptom Of A Failed State

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 01:36 AM PDT

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Dr Kua Kia Soong, SUARAM Adviser

 
The amendments to the Prevention of Crime Act (PCA) which allows detention without trial is symptomatic of a failed transformation programme by the Najib government to bring the country into the league of nations that follow the rule of law. No other country that espouses adherence to democracy and human rights uses detention without trial laws to tackle crime.

The reasons why this situation has come about and why the government has been helpless in implementing the Independent Police Complaints & Misconduct Commission (IPCMC) perhaps point to more sinister factors involving skeletons in government leaders' cupboards. And the reason why organised crime has become so intractable in recent years points to rotten apples in the police barrel.
 
We have had some hints of that recently. You will remember that after he retired, the former Inspector General of Police Musa Hassan had revealed political influences on the police force to release certain individuals. This IGP's former aide de camp, Noor Azizul Rahim in turn retaliated by accusing Musa of wrongdoings and silencing critics.
 
I can't think of any other reasons for the impunity enjoyed by the police despite the annual human rights violations relating to detentions without trial, deaths in police custody and deaths through police shootings. After all, the IPCMC was one of the recommendations by the Royal Commission on the Police in 2005.
 
SUARAM's Human Rights Report 2012 show that deaths in police custody and deaths through police shootings continue unabated: Deaths in police custody cases show 7 in 2010, 25 in 2011 and 9 in 2012; deaths through police shooting cases show 18 in 2010, 25 in 2011 and 37 in 2012. Between 2000 and 2012, there were in total 209 deaths in police custody cases; between 2007 and 2012, there were 298 deaths through police shootings.
 
Tackling the problem of crime & gangs
The government and the police with the assistance of the mainstream media have recently made a big play of the proliferation of gangs and gangsters inflicted crimes in the country, blaming it on the repeal of the Emergency Ordinance (EO) which was intended for emergency purposes to save the life of a nation. Unfortunately, the EO was a convenient way for the police to rope in anyone they didn't like. This included respected members of parliament like Dr Jeyakumar Devaraj, the MP for Sungai Siput, who was detained without trial with five other PSM leaders in 2011 as well as suspected thiefs and illegal lottery runners.
 
The government, police and the mainstream press have not asked the pertinent question: how did cities such as Hong Kong, Singapore and others tackle their triad problems without relying on detention without trial?
 
We have a Societies Act that is obsessed with cracking down on any organisation that is not pro-BN and that is why SUARAM chose to register under the Registrar of Companies. In places like Hong Kong, their Societies Ordinance and an Organized & Serious Crimes Ordinance have been specifically enacted to tackle the triad problem. The former outlaws triads in Hong Kong and imposes stiff prison terms and penalties for any person convicted of professing or claiming to be an office bearer or managing or assisting in the management of a triad.
 
Hong Kong also established an Independent Commission against Corruption in 1974. The agency targeted brazen corruption within police ranks linked with triads, provided heavier penalties for organized crime activities and authorized the courts to confiscate the proceeds of such crimes. Hong Kong, as a British Colony, had the reputation of being one of the most corrupt cities in the world with a cosy association between law enforcement agencies and organized crime syndicates. Nearly all types of organized crimes, vice, gambling and drugs, were protected. Within three years, they had smashed all corruption syndicates in the Government and prosecuted 247 government officers, including 143 police officers.
 
Their success has been attributed to: (i) having an independent anti-corruption agency, free from any interference in conducting their investigation; (ii) strong financial support; (iii) having wide investigative powers, empowered to investigate all crimes which are connected with corruption but with an elaborate check and balance system to prevent abuse of such wide power; (iv) being highly professional in  investigations, including video recording of all interviews of suspects; (v) a strategy that includes prevention and education.
 
Although Hong Kong is not totally free of violent crime, it is a comparatively safe place to live in. Comparable communities in developed Asia, like Japan, Korea and Singapore, also have markedly lower crime rates than most Western societies. (South China Morning Post, 22.2.2013)
 
Failure to solve poverty, social dislocation & inequality
Social dislocation, inequality and poverty are known factors in crime. The destruction of the rubber plantation communities, growing inequality and marginalisation through racial discrimination has driven many into crime. Poverty and crime are clearly feeding on each other, and the government has to make this a priority in its professed transformation plan.
 
They should not be indulging in their usual wasteful exploits of spying on dissidents, harassing NGOs, detaining dissidents without trial, breaking up peaceful assemblies and such distractions from the serious work of tackling organised crime.
 

 

This retrogressive PCA Bill has put us in the league of banana republics in which people run the risk of being detained without trial and where our society will never be at peace with itself…

 

Chin Peng and the Dignity of Man

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 01:32 AM PDT

http://www.malaysiandigest.com/images/images/Kee_Thuan_Chye.jpg

The Sulu terrorists who were shot dead by our security forces when they made the incursion into Lahad Datu earlier this year were also buried on Malaysian soil. Did they deserve that? Did they deserve it more than Chin Peng, who fought for our country's independence, whereas they came to seize our land?

Kee Thuan Chye

The dignity of man. That was what Chin Peng bargained for at the Baling Talks held in 1955 with Tunku Abdul Rahman, David Marshall and a few others in a bid to negotiate peace. And because they would not grant him and his comrades of the Communist Party of Malaya (CPM) that, because they would not accord them dignity but instead insist that they surrender and subject themselves to detention, the talks failed.
 
I have read the transcript of the Baling Talks several times, and can vouch that Chin Peng was serious about peace and about coming out of the jungle to participate in the ensuing legitimate democratic process. He also appeared genuine in his intent and dignified in his approach to the negotiations. If you don't believe what I say, do read the transcript. It will open your eyes.
 
You will see that Chin Peng and his comrades were willing to lay down their arms and take their places in society. He asked for the CPM to be allowed to take part in democratic elections, but although the Tunku admitted that the CPM's manifesto was "quite good", it could not do so. It had to be disbanded.
 
Chin Peng agreed to compromise. But when he asked how he and his comrades would be treated when they came out of the jungle, the Tunku told him they would be detained "for a certain period" and investigated.
 
Asked how long the detention would be, the Tunku did not give a specific answer. "The length of detention will only be for as long as is necessary to carry out the investigation" was all he would say.
 
To Chin Peng, however, "this question of restriction of freedom … is a question of principle". And he, therefore, could not accept it.
 
He added: "For the dignity of man, if this principle is insisted upon, then we can only carry on with the struggle."
 
Marshall then asked him: "… but what are you struggling for?"
 
"It is very simple," Chin Peng reiterated, "just for the dignity of man."
 
Marshall failed to understand what Chin Peng meant by "the dignity of man". Chin Peng clarified it for him: "While we are in the jungle, we are free. Why should we come out to be detained?"
 
But more than that, I think "the dignity of man" also included social justice, which was one of the ideals upheld by the CPM. Furthermore, Chin Peng was not willing to submit himself and his men to what was still not a liberated Malayan government. Let's not forget, it was 1955 – internal security and national defence were still under the British, which meant that the CPM, on surrendering, would be detained under their control. He probably didn't trust the British to accord the CPM due respect.
 
He promised the Tunku that when the latter's Malayan government were given charge of internal security and national defence, the CPM would no longer call itself "National Liberation Army". The CPM's fight was "for the independence of Malaya", he said, so once the Malayan government was independent, the CPM would no longer fight against it.
 
That being so, Chin Peng again made a case for no detention, no restriction of movement. He asked that he and his comrades be allowed to go home. If this was granted, it would be acceptable for the Government to investigate them. "But if we were to be enclosed in one place and investigations are carried out, that amounts to surrender," he said.
 
Again, he showed he was willing to compromise. But as it turned out, the Tunku was not. He insisted that "as far as restriction of movement is concerned, we must have it". He also repeated at the end of the talks the sentiment he had expressed at its beginning: "Unfortunately, although you do not like the word 'surrender', I have got to be frank with you and say that you have got to surrender."
 
This left Chin Peng with no choice. He had already stated: "If you demand our surrender, we would prefer to fight to the last man." So he left the talks a disappointed man.
 
But what about the Tunku? Was he disappointed?
 
According to journalist Said Zahari, who was covering the talks for Utusan Melayu, he managed to ask the Tunku that question after the proceedings had ended. Only he and Umno man Syed Jaafar Albar were present when the Tunku replied, "No, no, not at all. I never wanted it to be a success."
 
Only recently – a few years ago – Said came out to reveal this. He did not include what the Tunku said when he wrote his report in 1955, because Syed Albar advised him against making it public. So we never got to know the Tunku's real intent.
 
In hindsight, however, we can now infer that the British were dead against recognising the CPM and allowing it to be part of the Malayan political landscape because that might have jeopardised their economic interests, and the Tunku was using the talks to prove to the British that he could be uncompromising with the CPM as this would favour him in his negotiations for independence, which he flew to London for right after Baling.
 
Whetever it was, Chin Peng got played out.
 
And although he was to be played out again a few times afterwards, for example, when he made numerous unsuccessful attempts to settle in Malaysia after the Government had signed a peace agreement with the CPM in 1989, it seems he never compromised his dignity.
 
Even now, after his death on September 16, the dignity appears intact. In his farewell letter to his comrades and compatriots published by Malaysiakini, he wrote: "… I wish to be remembered simply as a good man who could tell the world that he had dared to spend his entire life in pursuit of his own ideals to create a better world for his people. It is irrelevant whether I succeeded or failed, at least I did what I did."
 
This is the kind of dignity that the Malaysian Government cannot profess to have. It dishonoured the terms of the 1989 peace agreement by, first, not allowing Chin Peng to come home the numerous times he applied to do so, and now it shows lack of dignity for not even allowing his ashes to be brought back.
 
For this deplorable display, it has rightly earned the criticism of former Inspector-General of Police Rahim Noor, who headed the Malaysian team that negotiated the peace agreement. In barring Chin Peng's ashes from being brought back, he said, "we are making Malaysia a laughing stock to the whole world".
 
To make matters worse, the ruling party propaganda rag Utusan Malaysia came out last weekend with a story speculating that Chin Peng didn't die on September 16. Based on the say-so of an anonymous source, it said he had actually died the day before and "certain parties" had manipulated it such that his death would be commemorated with the birth of Malaysia! The report is unsubstantiated, and the anonymous source could be anyone just saying it.
 
To spin it further, Utusan quotes the source as saying that Chin Peng's farewell letter is dangerous because its call to youths to "struggle for idealism" may bring "more (security) threats to the country, especially among the youths". That's a laugh. Why doesn't the source interpret Chin Peng's call as a positive one instead, seeing idealism as something young people should always strive for? When has idealism become a negative and dangerous value?
 
This is the sort of sentiment that informs the stand of the Government in not allowing Chin Peng's ashes to be brought into the country, as expressed last week by Home Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi and his deputy, Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar. They are afraid that supporters will build a shrine where the ashes are buried and it will spark a revival of communism in Malaysia.
 
This is not only almost as ridiculous as the claim made by the Utusan's so-called source; it also shows what an insecure government we have.
 
Noordin Top was a Jemaah Islamiah terrorist who masterminded the bombings that led to the deaths of innocents in Jakarta and Bali, but his remains were allowed to be brought home in 2009 to be buried in Pontian. Was the Government not afraid that his burial ground would become a shrine to Muslim extremism?
 
The Sulu terrorists who were shot dead by our security forces when they made the incursion into Lahad Datu earlier this year were also buried on Malaysian soil. Did they deserve that? Did they deserve it more than Chin Peng, who fought for our country's independence, whereas they came to seize our land?
 
Is it not enough that our government lacks dignity? Must it also lack logic? Where is its sense of social justice, its kinship with the dignity of man?
 
 
* Kee Thuan Chye is the author of the new book The Elections Bullshit, now available in bookstores.

 

Witness in Klias petition says he received envelope from PKR agent

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 12:53 AM PDT

(Bernama) - A voter in the Klias state constituency told the Election Court here today that he received an envelope, with his name written on it, from a Parti Keadilan Rakyat (PKR) agent.

Saliman Salamat, 28, said the envelope, containing RM50 and a coupon, was given to him by an agent known as Wong Kui En @ Norliah, who went to his house with two other women at about 5pm on May 4 this year.

He said the three women went to his house a day before polling day for the 13th general election.

"I was with a friend, Amai, and brother-in-law, Wincent, talking outside the house in  Kampung Selagon, Beaufort, when I saw  Kairinah @ Irine Juakim and her two sisters, Norliah and Ruby approaching.

"Norliah then called for me and handed me an envelope with my name written on it. Norliah said to me that the RM50 and coupon were Datuk Lajim Ukin.

"She said if Datuk Lajim wins, the coupon can be exchanged for cash," he added.

He was testifying before Judge Datuk Yew Jen Kee on the second day of hearing of the petition filed by Barisan Nasional (BN) candidate Isnin Aliasnih to annul the 13the general election result for the Klias state seat.

Saliman said he opened the envelope in front of the three women.

"I know that many people had received the money and coupon distributed by the PKR people, not from the three women, because they have no permanent job," he added.

Saliman, a self-employed, said Norliah and her sisters stayed in the same village as him and that the three women were PKR supporters.

In the petition, Isnin named Lajim, the State PKR chairman who won the Klias seat, as the first respondent, while returning officer for the Klias state seat Jupari @ Jupty Etok and the Election Commission (EC) as the second and third respondent, respectively.

However, on August 5, Yew ordered the EC and the returning officer for the Klias state seat to be removed as respondents on grounds that the petitioner had failed to comply with provisions under the Election offences Act.

Isnin filed the petition, claiming that there were alleged corruption and irregularities during the election campaign.

Isnin was represented by lawyers Jaapar Esteban, Rizuan M Borhan, Saiful Azian Mokhtar and Muamar Julkarnain, while Lajim was represented by lawyers Datuk Chau Chin Tang and Datuk Lawrence Thien.

In the May 5 general election, Lajim won the seat with a majority of 179 votes. 

 

Marriage between Muslim and non-Muslim illegal, says Jakim

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 12:37 AM PDT

(Bernama) - Any marriage between a Muslim and a non-Muslim is disallowed and is not recognised in this country and action can be taken by the state Islamic religious authorities, said Malaysian Islamic Development Department (Jakim) director-general Datuk Othman Mustapha.

He said Islamic family laws state no Muslim man can marry a non-Muslim woman and no Muslim woman can marry a non-Muslim man.

"A marriage between spouses of different religions is completed prohibited and against the principle of beliefs of the Shafie sect (Ahli Sunnah Wal Jamaah) in Malaysia," he said in a statement here today.

He was commenting on a Universiti Malaya study on the issue of liberalism in Muslim marriages with non-Muslim spouses not having to convert from their religions. 

Two days ago, Universiti Malaya Academy of Islamic Studies, Department of Akidah and Islamic Thought Associate Prof Dr Khadijah Hambali told religious authorities in the country to carry out specific measures to curb the phenomenon.  

 

Kenyataan Media PENDAFTAR PERTUBUHAN

Posted: 27 Sep 2013 12:20 AM PDT

Pendaftar Pertubuhan di sini ingin menerangkan sekali lagi tentang isu Pemilihan CEC DAP khasnya untuk pemahaman semua yang terlibat secara langsung dalam hal ini memandangkan tindakan pemimpin DAP yang mendukacitakan.

Setiausaha Agung DAP, Lim Guan Eng harus belajar membaca dan memahami apa yang telah dinyatakan oleh ROS mengenai pemilihan semula CEC DAP. ROS tidak pernah menyatakan yang DAP tidak boleh mengadakan 'Special Congress' tetapi hanya telah mengingatkan DAP supaya mengikut peruntukan-peruntukan dalam Undang-undang tubuhnya sendiri semasa mengadakan pemilihan semula tersebut. Dalam hal ini penghantaran Notis Panggilan kepada ahli dalam tempoh 10 minggu sepertimana yang tercatat di dalam Undang-undangnya harus di patuhi.

Harus di tekankan disini bahawa DAP telah menghadapi tindakan mahkamah oleh ahli-ahlinya sendiri dan ini tidak ada kaitan sama sekali dengan ROS, memandangkan ahli-ahlinya sendiri telah membawa perkara mengenai pemilihan CEC DAP yang tidak teratur ke muka pengadilan. Adalah tidak wajar ROS di kaitkan dalam hal ini memandangkan tindakan ini daripada akar umbinya sendiri.

Namun demikian, walaupun Seksyen 18C, Akta Pertubuhan 1966 menyatakan hal ehwal parti adalah muktamad dan konklusif serta tidak boleh dibawa ke mahkamah tetapi ini tidak bererti ROS tidak mempunyai kuasa untuk mengambil tindakan demi menegakkan kebenaran khasnya bila hak ahli-ahlinya terjejas.

Akta Pertubuhan 1966 (Akta 335) adalah suatu Akta yang telah diluluskan oleh Parlimen dan semua pihak harus menghormatinya dan ROS yang bertanggungjawab dalam menguatkuasakannya.

 

DATO' ABDUL RAHMAN BIN OTHMAN

Pendaftar Pertubuhan Malaysia

Jabatan Pendaftaran Pertubuhan Malaysia

 

In the Chinese Press: Some members try to reduce my vote tally, says Guan Eng

Posted: 26 Sep 2013 06:55 PM PDT

by Chan Wei See, fz.com

The upcoming DAP re-election is heating up. DAP secretary-general Lim Guan Eng revealed that some people were going behind his back, attempting to bring down his vote tally and lobbying the delegates to not attend the congress scheduled Sept 29.

In an exclusive interview with Sin Chew Daily today, he conceded that some DAP members have a feeling of discontent against him as they themselves, or their preferred leaders, were either not being fielded as candidates in the 13th general election (GE13) or not being appointed as government officials after the GE.
 
To his surprise, those who went behind his back were those he never expected, while those he supposed would made some noise, were just keeping quiet.
 
The Penang chief minister was responding to claims that there is a strong undercurrent beneath the surface of the re-election in which delegates from a couple of states were attempting to topple him secretly.
 
He said, in the interview highlighted on the daily's front page, "I can't predict whether the result of the re-election will be far different from the previous result but I opine that those who work in the dark are just minority, while most members and delegates are still deeply in love with the party."
 
While admitting that what was previously reported did take place, he believed those who vent their anger on him still love the party, hence he hoped these delegates will still attend the congress to show solidarity.
 
It was reported in the Chinese papers that ripples of dissent against Lim had been getting stronger in Johor, seemingly a backlash against DAP Central's decision to field "parachute candidates" in the GE instead of those favoured by the grassroot members.
 
The resentment is particularly strong in Kulai and Muar in which their delegates were said to be planning to cast "emotional votes" to reduce Lim's vote.
 
DAP Kulai division liaison committee chairman Ng Pack Seong and former Senai assemblyman Ong Kow Meng had openly told Oriental Daily News that they will abstain from voting.
 
Chin Woo dismisses public basketball court suggestion
 
The board of directors of SJK (C) Chin Woo has objected to Culture and Tourism Minister Datuk Seri Nazri Aziz's suggestion to rebuild the school's basketball court as a "public basketball court", China Press reported today.
 
A delegation comprising representatives of the board, The United Chinese Schools Teachers' Association (Dong Zong) and other Chinese groups had a meeting with Chief Secretary to the Government Tan Sri Dr. Ali Hamsa yesterday.
 
They expressed their stance in defending the "completeness" of the school land.
 
Responding to reporters' question, the school director Oo Tin Fuan said Nazri's proposal to rebuild the basketball court for public use is unacceptable to the board.
 
Dong Zong chairman Yap Sin Tian said he strongly opposed the proposal, unless the government transfers the ownership of the land to Chin Woo.
 
He said if the rebuilt basketball is open to public, it will cause inconvenience to the school as it will have to make an appointment with the management whenever it wishes to use it.
 
However, in an immediate response, Nazri stressed that the land belongs to the government, thus the board has no say over its usage.
 
On Wednesday, Nazri has suggested that the government rebuilds the school's basketball court and open it for public, as a win-win solution to the stalemate.

ADUN Luyang umum keluar DAP

Posted: 26 Sep 2013 06:49 PM PDT

(BH) - Ahli Dewan Undangan Negeri (ADUN) Luyang, Dr Hiew King Cheu sebentar tadi mengumumkan keluar DAP dan menjadi wakil rakyat bebas.

Bekas Ahli Parlimen Kota Kinabalu dan bekas Penasihat DAP mengesahkan perkara itu di sini.
Dengan itu, King Cheu dipercayai ADUN pertama keluar parti dan menjadi wakil rakyat Bebas di negara ini selepas Pilihan Raya Umum ke-13 (PRU-13).

Beliau akan menghantar surat peletakkan jawatannya ke Ibu Pejabat DAP Pusat, hari ini.

King Cheu setakat ini bagaimanapun enggan memberikan sebab keluar DAP sebaliknya ketika dihubungi Berita Harian, beliau akan memberikan kenyataan pebuh berhubung perkara itu petang ini selepas menghantar notis kepada parti.

Pada 12 Ogos lalu, King Cheu meletak jawatan sebagai Penasihat DAP berikutan pertelingkahan antara wakil rakyat DAP berhubung isu pelantikan Ketua Pembangkang di Dewan Undangan Negeri (DUN) Sabah.

DAP Sabah mahukan ADUN Tamparuli, Datuk Wilfred Bumburing dilantik Ketua Pembangkang tetapi King Cheu mencadangkan semua 12 ADUN pembangkang mengangkat tangan bagi memilih Ketua Pembangkang. 

 

Court rules no jurisdiction over party matters, DAP re-election on

Posted: 26 Sep 2013 06:37 PM PDT

(The Star) - The High Court has struck off a lawsuit by Ladang Paroi DAP vice-chairman A. David Das, paving the way for the party to hold its special congress on Sunday to re-elect central executive committee (CEC) members.

The court has ordered David to pay RM5,000 in costs.

Justice Rosnaini Saub held that the court has no jurisdiction to interfere in the decision of a political party on any matter relating to its affairs.

The judge said that the Parliament in its wisdom has enacted Section 18 (c) of the Societies Act 1966 in such very clear words that the decision of a political party to be final and conclusive.

"The decision of the political party in interpretation of the party's Constitution cannot be challenged by the court," she told the packed courtroom which caused cheers and claps from DAP supporters.

Justice Rosnaini said that it was obvious that DAP had chosen to interpret the party's Constitution Standing Order upon getting the directive from the Registrar of Societies to re-elect CEC members.

Justice Rosnaini said the claim by David that DAP may be deregistered if it hold a special congress to re-elect CEC members was not something for the court to speculate on.

"It is for the ROS to decide. It is not for the court to speculate for what will the ROS decision to be," she said.

The judge also held that David's application for an injunction to stop the CEC polls for allegedly breaching the party's constitution was without foundation.

In his lawsuit filed on Sept 10, David has named DAP secretary-general Lim Guan Eng and the party, which was registered as a political party on March 18, 1966 as defendants.

Speaking to reporters here, Lim said that he was happy with the court ruling as it has upheld the law as stipulated in their party's Constitution.

In his suit, David among others wanted an order demanding DAP give a 10-week notice before holding the national congress.

He also requested that a declaration that the party's special congress notice dated Sept 4 which was issued by Lim for the appointment of CEC members be struck out.

 

PCA: Sympton of a failed state

Posted: 26 Sep 2013 06:22 PM PDT

By Dr Kua Kia Soong, SUARAM Adviser

The amendments to the Prevention of Crime Act (PCA) which allows detention without trial is symptomatic of a failed transformation programme by the Najib government to bring the country into the league of nations that follow the rule of law. No other country that espouses adherence to democracy and human rights uses detention without trial laws to tackle crime.

The reasons why this situation has come about and why the government has been helpless in implementing the Independent Police Complaints & Misconduct Commission (IPCMC) perhaps point to more sinister factors involving skeletons in government leaders' cupboards. And the reason why organised crime has become so intractable in recent years points to rotten apples in the police barrel.

We have had some hints of that recently. You will remember that after he retired, the former Inspector General of Police Musa Hassan had revealed political influences on the police force to release certain individuals. This IGP's former aide de camp, Noor Azizul Rahim in turn retaliated by accusing Musa of wrongdoings and silencing critics.

I can't think of any other reasons for the impunity enjoyed by the police despite the annual human rights violations relating to detentions without trial, deaths in police custody and deaths through police shootings. After all, the IPCMC was one of the recommendations by the Royal Commission on the Police in 2005.

SUARAM's Human Rights Report 2012 show that deaths in police custody and deaths through police shootings continue unabated: Deaths in police custody cases show 7 in 2010, 25 in 2011 and 9 in 2012; deaths through police shooting cases show 18 in 2010, 25 in 2011 and 37 in 2012. Between 2000 and 2012, there were in total 209 deaths in police custody cases; between 2007 and 2012, there were 298 deaths through police shootings.

Tackling the problem of crime & gangs

The government and the police with the assistance of the mainstream media have recently made a big play of the proliferation of gangs and gangsters inflicted crimes in the country, blaming it on the repeal of the Emergency Ordinance (EO) which was intended for emergency purposes to save the life of a nation. Unfortunately, the EO was a convenient way for the police to rope in anyone they didn't like. This included respected members of parliament like Dr Jeyakumar Devaraj, the MP for Sungai Siput, who was detained without trial with five other PSM leaders in 2011 as well as suspected thiefs and illegal lottery runners.

The government, police and the mainstream press have not asked the pertinent question: how did cities such as Hong Kong, Singapore and others tackle their triad problems without relying on detention without trial?

We have a Societies Act that is obsessed with cracking down on any organisation that is not pro-BN and that is why SUARAM chose to register under the Registrar of Companies. In places like Hong Kong, their Societies Ordinance and an Organized & Serious Crimes Ordinance have been specifically enacted to tackle the triad problem. The former outlaws triads in Hong Kong and imposes stiff prison terms and penalties for any person convicted of professing or claiming to be an office bearer or managing or assisting in the management of a triad.

Hong Kong also established an Independent Commission against Corruption in 1974. The agency targeted brazen corruption within police ranks linked with triads, provided heavier penalties for organized crime activities and authorized the courts to confiscate the proceeds of such crimes. Hong Kong, as a British Colony, had the reputation of being one of the most corrupt cities in the world with a cosy association between law enforcement agencies and organized crime syndicates. Nearly all types of organized crimes, vice, gambling and drugs, were protected. Within three years, they had smashed all corruption syndicates in the Government and prosecuted 247 government officers, including 143 police officers.

Their success has been attributed to: (i) having an independent anti-corruption agency, free from any interference in conducting their investigation; (ii) strong financial support; (iii) having wide investigative powers, empowered to investigate all crimes which are connected with corruption but with an elaborate check and balance system to prevent abuse of such wide power; (iv) being highly professional in  investigations, including video recording of all interviews of suspects; (v) a strategy that includes prevention and education.

Although Hong Kong is not totally free of violent crime, it is a comparatively safe place to live in. Comparable communities in developed Asia, like Japan, Korea and Singapore, also have markedly lower crime rates than most Western societies. (South China Morning Post, 22.2.2013)

Failure to solve poverty, social dislocation & inequality

Social dislocation, inequality and poverty are known factors in crime. The destruction of the rubber plantation communities, growing inequality and marginalisation through racial discrimination has driven many into crime. Poverty and crime are clearly feeding on each other, and the government has to make this a priority in its professed transformation plan.

They should not be indulging in their usual wasteful exploits of spying on dissidents, harassing NGOs, detaining dissidents without trial, breaking up peaceful assemblies and such distractions from the serious work of tackling organised crime.

This retrogressive PCA Bill has put us in the league of banana republics in which people run the risk of being detained without trial and where our society will never be at peace with itself…

 

How free are we to express ourselves under the Federal Constitution?

Posted: 26 Sep 2013 03:38 PM PDT

https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT9hpT1UIVD8u91DMa6PdT3foiRob0Zc5tHray6Yfz4tBOZEtRarg

Courts have the power to declare a law passed by Parliament as being contrary to the Federal Constitution and void (without effect and ceasing to exist). It can also invalidate a government decision. The courts would do this through the process known as judicial review.

By Fahri Azzat, LoyarBurok

ALTHOUGH the right to freedom of speech is often expressed as a separate right, in truth it is part of the right to freedom of expression. On a personal level, this is your essential right to manifest yourself and your thoughts by words, dressing and actions.
 
For example, you can jog backwards through town while dressed in a cheap pirate costume while reciting erotic Latin poems. Though it is not encouraged because it is a silly thing to do (and it definitely won't help you in becoming a chick magnet), but hey, that's your constitutional right as enshrined in Article 10(1)(a) of the Federal Constitution. Nobody can prevent you from doing this, although your loved ones will try very hard to dissuade you (and you should listen to them).
 
On a social level, that freedom of expression is manifested in several ways.
 
The first is the ability to move about freely and unhindered, or to stay in any part of Malaysia. It is entirely understandable however if you choose not to stay in Kangar, Perlis. This right to freedom of movement is enshrined in Article 9(2) of the Federal Constitution.
 
The second is the right to "assemble peaceably and without arms" as provided in Article 10(1)(b) of the Federal Constitution. You may be relieved to know that cutting off your arms is not a precondition to a peaceful assembly. Your arms don't even need to be well toned. Hell, you don't even need them because "arms" here refers to weapons. Salt or mineral water bottles do not count.
 
The third is the right to engage with others no matter how undesirable they are to your family or friends and to form "associations" with them.
 
Associations here do not refer to your machas whom you hang out with at mamaks, no matter what your little group is. It is used in the broader sense to mean organisations such as societies; organisations and parties such as the Malaysian Nature Society,  National Human Rights Society and United Malays National Organisation. This is contained in Article 10(1)(c) of the Federal Constitution.
 
These rights are known as fundamental liberties because they are fundamental to every human being regardless of race, religion, class, wealth or political affiliation.
 
It is in the exercise of all these rights that we are able to fully manifest our humanity, and hopefully that would lead to contentment and productivity on a personal, societal, and national plane. They are also important to realising our humanity, to cultivating a democracy, and to keeping governments accountable. Or a whole lot of wicked fun. It's really up to us.
 
Having said that, these rights are not absolute. They are subject to the limitations that promote public order, public health, security, and responsibility to those rights.
 
Your right to freedom of speech and expression is restricted to the extent necessary to preserve national security, friendly relations with other countries, public order and public morality.
 
You also cannot simply say nasty untrue things about others, or persuade someone to commit an offence. For these same reasons you will, for example, not be allowed to dress in the tightest speedos and walk about town no matter how nonchalantly. You could be arrested on grounds of public morality, or public order, regardless of how buff you are.

READ MORE HERE

The three stars: Chin Peng, Najib and Dr M

Posted: 26 Sep 2013 03:17 PM PDT

http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/mahathir-chin-peng-najib.jpg

If communism is so bad, why does the Malaysian government entertain China, whilst demonising the CPM and mistreating Malaysians of Chinese origin?

Malaysian schoolchildren are not taught that British forces funded, trained and supplied arms to Chin Peng during World War Two. The combined effort was to liberate the country from the Japanese aggressors. A few years after WWII, the communists waged war on the British because the CPM wanted to free Malaysia from British colonial rule.

Mariam Mokhtar, FMT

It is communism which bonds the late secretary-general of the Communist Party of Malaya (CPM) Chin Peng, former prime minister Dr Mahathir Mohamad and Umno Baru president, Najib Tun Razak.

Members of CPM cadres wear a jungle green uniform complete with a cap sporting a badge of three red stars. These three stars signify the three main races in Malaysia – Chinese, Indian and Malay, much like Najib's '1Malaysia'.

Chin Peng preached communist ideology, but the Malaya he envisioned was a country where the races were equal, unlike the Ketuanan Melayu concept of the Umno Baru elite, where Malays reign supreme.

Over the last few days, Malaysians have found a reason to rejoice. Former prime minister, Mahathir has recovered from a bout of amnesia, which marred his performance at the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Project IC, in Kota Kinabalu.

Last week, during a press conference, at the International Youth Centre in Cheras, Mahathir reminded Malaysians that Chin Peng wanted to make Malaysia a communist state.

Amazingly, Mahathir remembered Chin Peng, but it is hardly surprising that he was critical of the communist leader. He is keen to deflect criticism as a prime minister who does not honour agreements.

Both Mahathir and Najib are conscious of their public image. Neither men like being known as untrustworthy. The timing is critical as Mahathir has an election to manage, in which he will back his favourite contender; his son, Mukhriz.

Mahathir tried to project the image of a government that was magnanimous and would help rehabilitate former communist guerrillas. When the 1989 Hadyai treaty was signed, guerrillas voluntarily surrendered and their arms and stockpiles of weapons were destroyed.

However, Chin Peng was barred from entering Malaysia and when he died, his ashes are also prevented from being interred at his family grave near Lumut, for fear that a memorial to honour Sitiawan's former son would be built.

Mahathir had no intention of honouring the peace treaty. His word is as good as Najib's "Janji di tepati".

Mahathir criticised Chin Peng for his communist ideology, but failed to note that Malaysia has become a closet dictatorship, in which the sons of past prime ministers, are groomed, in exactly the same manner as the North Korean communist dynasty.

At least, in a communist state, the financial and social status of peasants is elevated to that of the middle classes, and the upper classes are brought down to the financial and social status of the middle classes.

Everyone is made (almost) equal. In communism, production is controlled by the state and the state owns everything.

In Malaysia's dictatorship, most of the wealth is in the hands of Umno Baru politicians, their cronies and the government controlled GLCs. In Sabah and Sarawak, the wealth from these oil and timber rich states is inaccessible to the ordinary folk.

The communist threat

Chin Peng may have wanted a communist state but in 2001, it was Mahathir who declared Malaysia an Islamic state. He tried to convince Malays that the Islam preached by Umno Baru was more acceptable than PAS's brand of conservative Islam. He erased Tunku Abdul Rahman's secular vision of Malaysia.

If Malaysia was democratic, as Mahathir claims, the rakyat would have been able to throw off the yoke of oppression in GE13, when 51% of the electorate, voted for the Opposition. Yet, the nation is still saddled with the oppressive regime of Umno Baru.

After World War II, countries were rebuilding and Malaya's riches from rubber and tin, were needed to fund the reconstruction of Britain. In war-scarred Malaya, factories were rebuilt, estates started producing and mines resumed operations. The output was twice what it had been before the war but workers wages were still depressed.

Food was in short supply and the suffering of the people was compounded by the discovery that Japanese war-currency was useless. Malayans were destitute.

Chin Peng's efforts to obtain better conditions and wages for the workers were futile. He encouraged strikes which turned nasty. His excuse was that he was fighting for the people. At least, he did not commit treason by giving ICs and citizenship to illegal foreigners.

Some people might wonder what Malaysia would be like as a communist state, and make comparisons with the People's Republic of China's (PRC).

The economic output of the PRC helps keep the economies of many countries alive. PRC nationals form the highest numbers of tourists to many destinations around the world. Singapore is attracting PRC nationals to work and live on the island, to the detriment of its own citizens. The rate of millionaires and billionaires being formed in PRC is high.

If communism is so bad, why does the Malaysian government entertain the PRC, whilst demonising the CPM and mistreating Malaysians of Chinese origin?

Malaysian schoolchildren are not taught that British forces funded, trained and supplied arms to Chin Peng during World War Two. The combined effort was to liberate the country from the Japanese aggressors. A few years after WWII, the communists waged war on the British because the CPM wanted to free Malaysia from British colonial rule.

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